Last item for navigation
BCS Student Goes to National Science Competition
BCS Student Goes to National Science Competition
Posted on 05/11/2022
A unique, science-driven extracurricular program is in full swing at Charles D. Owen High School (OHS). It’s known as the Army Educational Outreach Program, and it helps foster high school independent research contests. Staff at the school are trained in the program to facilitate the students with their projects and competitions.By: Breanna Hensley
BCS Communications Dept.

A unique, science-driven extracurricular program is in full swing at Charles D. Owen High School (OHS). It’s known as the Army Educational Outreach Program, and it helps foster high school independent research contests. Staff at the school are trained in the program to facilitate the students with their projects and competitions.

“Students identify a problem they want to research, and the Army funds the materials needed to complete the research,” said Assistant Principal Coleman Bailey. “We meet one Saturday a month and on Thursdays where we sometimes have other high schools or college mentors join us virtually.”

This year’s researchers came up with ideas about a self-regulating greenhouse, fire resistant bras, and the quality of soil from a materials plant that burned down many years ago. The students went to both a regional level and state level for the competition.

“This being the first year of doing this at Owen, we had four groups of students participate,” said Mr. Bailey. “All four of the groups made it to the state level. One project placed third overall. Two projects were nominated for the Genius Olympiad. Each year a university in New York holds this event.”

Senior Riley Johnson and Junior Julia Givens tested the soil at the former Beacon plant in Swannanoa. The team studied the nutrients and pH in the soil to see how nature has recovered over the course of 20 years without human intervention.

“We found compared to other soil in the area the land at the former plant had lower nutrients, but it did have an average pH level,” Riley explained. “We found that without human intervention nature has not been able to produce healthy soil in the past 20 years.”

With the amount of research that Riley and Julia did, their project was chosen to go to the National competition. The Army paid the expenses for Riley to travel to Albuquerque, New Mexico. There he presented his project to several others from across the country. Riley did not place in the national competition, but he is still honored to have had the opportunity.

“I am proud of myself and my partner’s work in this project,” Riley said. “We worked hard to make it to this level. It’s exciting to be representing OHS this year.”

Mr. Bailey said that there has been such an interest from students to continue with the Army’s Educational Outreach Program. Next year they anticipate a much higher turnout.

    Buncombe County Schools is in the process of reviewing its website to ensure compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act. Buncombe County Schools does not discriminate on the basis of sex in its education programs or activities and is required by Title IX of the Education Amendments Act of 1972 and federal regulations to not discriminate in such a manner. This requirement extends to admission and employment. Inquiries about the application of Title IX and its implementing federal regulations may be referred to the Title IX Coordinator and/or the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights in the Office for Civil Rights at the U.S. Department of Education. The Title IX Coordinator's contact information is: Shanon Martin, shanon.martin@bcsemail.org, 828-255-5918, 175 Bingham Road, Asheville, NC 28806.

    Website by SchoolMessenger Presence. © 2022 Intrado Corporation.
    All rights reserved. Privacy Statement