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Digging In to Science at Reynolds Middle
Digging In to Science at Reynolds Middle
Posted on 05/18/2021
“I enjoy watching students make a conservation connection,” said Ms. Lance “They learned that it takes 500 – 1000 years to form an inch of soil, while creating the edible soils brings it to life!  This piece of knowledge puts them in the conservation mode and encourages protection of our natural resources.” By Stacia Harris
BCS Communications Department

It was a dirty job, but Reynolds Middle School sixth graders were happy to participate.

Recently, a team from the county and state Soil and Water Conservation Departments helped Reynolds students dig into soil and learn why it’s so important to our community. Taira Lance, with the county’s Soil and Water Conservation District, says students learned how many necessities begin with soil.


“Without soil, we would not have food, clothing, or building materials,” said Ms. Lance. “We used hands-on examination and discussions to teach students about soil factors including drainage, root depth, texture, structure, permeability, slope, and erosion. We also discussed the importance of erosion control and keeping sedimentation out of the watershed.”

After the presentation, students made their own edible soil! Using treats like cookies, pudding, coconut flakes, and gummy worms, students showed off their understanding of the different layers that comprise our soil. From the bedrock (Oreos) to subsoil (pudding) to sprinkles on top to represent organic matter such as leaves, the students were able to connect what they’ve learned in the classroom to the hands-on experience.

“The students were engaged and enjoyed a day outside learning from the experts in the field,” said sixth grade Science teacher Jennifer Williams. “A part of our sixth grade curriculum is soil, so this is directly related to our Science Standard Course of Study.”  

Ms. Lance was joined by Dalton Buchanan and Bob Dennis of the state’s Division of Soil & Water Conservation. This is a presentation that is shared with students all around Buncombe County. Ms. Lance hopes that this raises awareness about the importance of responsibly managing our environment.

“I enjoy watching students make a conservation connection,” said Ms. Lance “They learned that it takes 500 – 1000 years to form an inch of soil, while creating the edible soils brings it to life!  This piece of knowledge puts them in the conservation mode and encourages protection of our natural resources.” 
“I enjoy watching students make a conservation connection,” said Ms. Lance “They learned that it takes 500 – 1000 years to form an inch of soil, while creating the edible soils brings it to life!  This piece of knowledge puts them in the conservation mode and encourages protection of our natural resources.”

Buncombe County Schools is in the process of reviewing its website to ensure compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act. Buncombe County Schools does not discriminate on the basis of sex in its education programs or activities and is required by Title IX of the Education Amendments Act of 1972 and federal regulations to not discriminate in such a manner. This requirement extends to admission and employment. Inquiries about the application of Title IX and its implementing federal regulations may be referred to the Title IX Coordinator and/or the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights in the Office for Civil Rights at the U.S. Department of Education. The Title IX Coordinator's contact information is: Shanon Martin, shanon.martin@bcsemail.org, 828-255-5918, 175 Bingham Road, Asheville, NC 28806.

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