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Students Shine in Art Awards
Students Shine in Art Awards
Posted on 02/04/2021
Pictured are "Silence" by Emilia Saltzman (Photography, Honorable Mention), top left; screenshot from "Pals" by Stacia Black (Film and Animation, Silver Key Award), top right; "Glued to the Screen" by Cole Bonnie (Drawing and Illustration, Honorable Mention), bottom left; and "Drowning in Plastic" by Larkin Garden (Fashion, Honorable Mention).Pictured are "Silence" by Emilia Saltzman (Photography, Honorable Mention), top left; screenshot from "Pals" by Stacia Black (Film and Animation, Silver Key Award), top right; "Glued to the Screen" by Cole Bonnie (Drawing and Illustration, Honorable Mention), bottom left; and "Drowning in Plastic" by Larkin Garden (Fashion, Honorable Mention).

By Tim Reaves
BCS Communications Department

Through the visual arts, BCS students find their creative voices and access their imaginations.

Starting this Saturday, four accomplished BCS artists will be featured in the Scholastic Art and Writing Awards, the nation’s longest-running, most prestigious recognition program for creative teens. A.C. Reynolds High School (ACRHS) senior Bonnie Cole and junior Emilia Saltzman, Enka High School senior Stacia Black, and Martin L. Nesbitt, Jr. Discovery Academy junior Larkin Garden will have their artworks presented in the 2021 WNC Regional Scholastic Art Awards exhibition from Feb. 6-March 8 at the Asheville Art Museum. The Art Museum will post a virtual ceremony video on YouTube Premieres this Saturday, Feb. 6, at 2 p.m.

“These students accepted the challenge, and each of these art pieces reflects a student who rose to meet the challenge with their own originality, creative problem-solving skills, and craftsmanship,” said ACRHS art teacher Byron Browne. “Working with students who are determined to learn, experiment, and grow with their own art making process has been an inspiring force for me during these challenging times.”

Larkin Garden received an Honorable Mention for her fashion submission “Drowning in Plastic,” a dress made of recycled plastic netting, glowing “jellyfish,” and futuristic fabric that resembles fish scales. She originally intended to enter the dress in a technology competition, but the event was canceled because of COVID-19.

“As a young person, when I think of my future it is always closely tied with climate change and its devastating impact on the land and ocean,” Larkin said. “I was heartbroken when the technology competition was canceled, especially after logging around 200 hours of work and research on it. But having the opportunity to still share my message and design was a very fulfilling experience.”

That level of dedication comes from years of practice and skills cultivated by amazing teachers, said BCS Art Education Specialist Laura Mitchell.

“The Scholastic Art Awards is a juried show of the best of the best work where students can receive national attention and scholarships,” Ms. Mitchell said. “Any time a student’s work is juried into a show against all submitted works from Western North Carolina, it shows the students have a depth of not only art processes and skills but also deeper thinking and awareness of global issues and other important subject matters.”

BCS Arts instructors are working artists and fully licensed teachers. Art programs start in elementary school with foundational explorations across several media. In intermediate and middle school, students get to specialize and find their creative joy. By high school, art-oriented students have many advanced choices that can serve as pathways to the creative sector.

BCS has strong visual and performing arts programs. Visual arts include painting, 3D design, ceramics, digital art, printmaking, mixed media, fiber arts, photography, and more. Performing arts include marching and symphonic band, chamber choir, orchestra, theater, dance, and more.

    Buncombe County Schools is in the process of reviewing its website to ensure compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act. Buncombe County Schools does not discriminate on the basis of sex in its education programs or activities and is required by Title IX of the Education Amendments Act of 1972 and federal regulations to not discriminate in such a manner. This requirement extends to admission and employment. Inquiries about the application of Title IX and its implementing federal regulations may be referred to the Title IX Coordinator and/or the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights in the Office for Civil Rights at the U.S. Department of Education. The Title IX Coordinator's contact information is: Shanon Martin, shanon.martin@bcsemail.org, 828-255-5918, 175 Bingham Road, Asheville, NC 28806.

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